Santa Barbara Sailing Center - Sailing Instruction, Boat Rentals, Cruises, Kayaking and More
ASA Sailing School Curriculums

Click one of the ASA classes below to view the curriculum for that sailing course.

ASA 101 - Basic Keelboat Sailing ASA 105 - Coastal Navigation
ASA 103 - Basic Coastal Cruising ASA 106 - Advanced Coastal Cruising
ASA 104 - Bareboat Chartering  

101 - Basic Keelboat Sailing
General Description: Sailors must sail a boat of up to 27 feet in length in light to moderate winds and sea conditions in familiar waters without supervision. A preparatory Standard with no auxiliary power or navigation skills required. Successful candidates earn a National Safe Boating Certificate approved by NASBLA and the U.S. Coast Guard.

Sailing Knowledge

A Certified Sailor has successfully demonstrated his or her ability to:

Identify the following parts of a sailboat:
hull mast mainsail
keel boom bow
bow pulpit gooseneck jib
traveller stern stern pulpit
deck lifelines cabin
spreaders shrouds backstay
headstay forestay  

Describe the functions of the following items on a sailboat:
mainsheet rudder tiller / wheel
boomvang boom topping lift jib sheet(s)
halyard(s) winches fairlead vs. padeye
downhaul outhaul cunningham
stays / shrouds shackle telltails
spring / breast lines fenders cleats

Define the following terms:
port starboard skipper
helmsman crew forward
aft coming about jibing
running rigging standing rigging heel
ahead abeam astern
windward leeward beam

Identify the following sails and parts of a sail:
mainsail jib storm jib
spinnaker genoa hanks
battens batten packets bolt rope
luff leech foot
head tack clew

Explain the following terms and points of sail and identify them from diagrams:
in-irons head to wind luffing
close hauled close reach beam reach
broad reach running starboard tack
port tack windward boat leeward boat
heading up heading down / bearing away sailing by the lee

Apply the Navigation Rules (International and Inland Navigational Rules for prevention of collision) by means of diagrams in the following situations and identify the sailboat
or powerboat that is the "stand-on" and "give-way" boat.

  • Port tack and starboard tack sailboats
  • Windward and leeward sailboats
  • Overtaking situation
  • Boat on the right (danger zone)
  • Boats meeting head-on
  • Apply Rule 5 (Look-out Rule) contained in the Navigation Rules (International and Inland Navigation Rules for prevention of collision)
  • Describe the actions to be taken when sailing in the vicinity of commercial shipping (Rule 9. Nav. Rules)
  • Define hull identification number.
  • Describe the differance between planing and displacement hulls.
  • Describe proper means of waste disposal including penalties for improper disposal and means for Notification of authorities in the event of oil spillage.
  • Describe how and when to file a float plan.
  • Describe registration numbers and how to display them.
  • Describe a capacity plate, where to find one and the information which is contained on the plate.
  • Describe an alternate means of determining a boat's passenger capacity.
  • State the federal standards for determining intoxication using Blood Alcohol Content (BAC).
  • What is the BAC of the state in which you sail?
  • Give 5 situations which may be considered negligent operation on the part of boater.
  • Describe when and to whom boating accidents must be reported.
  • Describe under what circumstances an operator must render assistance to another boater in danger.
  • Describe the information an operator should acquire before operating his/her boat in an unfamiliar area.
  • Describe where a boater would get the information in the item above.
  • Be able to identify lateral aids to navigation by color, shape and numbering.
  • Be able to identify Safe Water, Information and Regulatory Markers by corol, shape and numbering.
  • List required safety equipment for recreational vessels between 23 and 40 feet.
  • Describe procedures for safety trailing and launching a boat.
  • Describe sound signals used by recreational vessels and their meanings.
  • Identify the location and color of running lights used by recreational vessels.
  • Describe common anchor types and anchoring procedures.

SAILING SKILLS

A Certified Sailor has successfully demonstrated his or her ability to:

GEAR AND EQUIPMENT

  • Select and properly use a personal flotation device.
  • Select proper clothing for sailing.
SAILING
  • Hoist the basic sails, set appropriate luff tensions, and coil and hang halyards and other lines.
  • Without an Instructor or direction, act as helmsman / skipper and crew on a sailboat using proper commands and responses while sailing away and back to a dock and mooring under various wind directions. Sail a windward / leeward course while performing successful come about and gybe.

    Sample Commands:
    "ease sheets" "easing sheets"
    "heading-up, sheet in" "sheeting in"
    "ready about" "ready"
    "helms-a-lee" "hard-alee"
    "ready to jibe" "ready" "jibe-ho"

  • Lower, fold and stow sails properly.
MAN OVERBOARD
  • Describe and demonstrate the actions to be taken by a helmsman / skipper when sailing from the time a person falls overboard without warning until the crew member is safely recovered.
  • Speed is secondary to safety in performing this procedure.
  • Describe how to get an exhausted person aboard.
  • Steer a sailboat by the lee for 100 yards without gybing.
  • Steer a sailboat moving backwards for 20 yards with sails backed.
  • Secure a sailboat to a dock so as to ensure limited movement and set out fenders properly.
KNOTS
  • Describe the function of and tie the following knots without assistance:
    • bowline (in less than 20 seconds)
    • figure eight (in less than 15 seconds)
    • cleat hitch (in less than 15 seconds)
  • Tie the following knots without assistance in less than 20 seconds:
    • reef / square knot
    • clove hitch
    • round turn and two half hitches
Special Note for Basic Keelboat Standard Certification
The American Sailing Association's Basic Keelboat Sailing course was recently approved by the National Association of Boating Law Administrators (NASBLA) and the U.S. Coast Guard as a recognized Safe Boating Course. As such, it meets all requirements for mandatory education and licensing for every state in the United States.

The Items listed below have been added to the Basic Keelboat Sailing Standard published in the ASA International Log Book. Please note that these items will be taught and tested in courses which lead to ASA Basic Keelboat Sailing Certification.

Apply the Navigation Rules (international and Inland Navigation Rules for prevention of collision) by means of diagrams in the following situations and identify the sailboat or powerboat that is the "stand-on" and "give-way" boat.

  • Boats meeting head-on
  • Define hull identification number
  • Describe the difference between planing and displacement hulls.
  • Describe proper means of waste disposal including penalties for improper disposal and means for notification of authorities in the event of oil spillage.
  • Describe how and when to file a float plan.
  • Describe registration numbers and how to display them.
  • Describe a capacity plate, where to find one and the information which is contained on the plate.
  • Describe an alternate means of determining a boat's passenger capacity
  • State the federal standards for determining intoxication using Blood Alcohol Content (BAC).
  • Give 5 situations which may be considered negligent operations on the part of a boater.
  • Describe when and to whom boating accidents must be reported.
  • Describe under what circumstances an operator must render assistance to another boater in danger.
  • Describe the information an operator should acquire before operating his/her boat in an unfamiliar area. Describe where a boater would get the information in the item above.
  • Be able to identify by color, shape and numbering, lateral aids to navigation.
  • Be able to identify by color, shape and numbering, Safe Water, Information and Regulatory Markers List required safety equipment for recreational vessels between 23 and 40 feet.
  • Describe procedures for safely trailing and launching a boat.
  • Describe sound signals used by recreational vessels and their meanings.
  • Identify the location and color of running lights used by recreational vessels.
  • Describe common anchor types and anchoring procedures.

103 - Basic Coastal Cruising [back to page top]
General Description: Able to cruise safely in local and regional waters as both skipper and crew on an auxiliary sailboat of up to 50 feet in length, in moderate winds and sea conditions.

SAILING KNOWLEDGE
A Certified Sailor has successfully demonstrated his or her ability to:

Identify and describe the following:

Gudgeon Pintle Turnbuckle
Stem fitting Tangs Chainplates
Binnacle Transom Rudderpost
Through-hull fitting Self-bailing cockpit

GEAR AND EQUIPMENT

  • List the "Federal equipment carriage requirements" for a 24 foot sailboat with an outboard motor and portable fuel tank.
  • List the ASA recommended safety equipment for a sailboat heading out on long cruises or into rough weather.
  • Describe the most important reasons for keeping gear and equipment stowed in assigned places on a boat.
  • Describe roller and slab reefing with reef grommets and reef points / diamonds.

SAFETY

  • Describe the purpose of a safety harness, proper attachment and dangers of improper attachment to a boat.
  • State the purpose of bow and stern pulpits and lifelines.
  • Describe federally required navigation lights on boats between sunset and sunrise when under sail, under power, and at anchor.
  • Describe the three stages of hypothermia and treatments for medium hypothermia.
  • Describe methods to reduce heat loss for a person in the water and a group of people in the water.
  • Describe how to prevent undue magnetic influences on the compass.
  • Identify the common sources of fire and /or explosion and understand the methods for preventing such occurrences, as well as actions to be taken when they do.
  • Describe U.S. Coast Guard recommended refueling precautions.
  • Describe a "diver's flag" and alpha flag used to mark persons and vessels engaged in diving.
  • Describe the danger involved in recharging batteries and setting off flares.
  • Apply the USCG Navigation Rules 11 through 17 by means of a diagram.
  • Describe the required and ASA recommended actions and precautions to be taken during times of reduced visibility.

WEATHER

  • Interpret marine weather forecasts applicable to the area and apply the information to the candidate's sailing plans for the next six hours.
  • Interpret what weather changes are forecast for the next six hours and determine what effect these changes will have on the day's planned activities.
DUTIES OF THE SKIPPER AND CREW

Identify the main responsibilities of the skipper and crew as indicated below:

    SKIPPER:
    • Safety of the crew and boat
    • Ensure the crew's knowledge of operating procedures and location of all lifesaving and other safety equipment prior to getting underway
    • Assign duties and instruction
    • Ensure proper /safe use of domestic equipment (head, stove, etc.)
    CREW
    • Obey skipper
    • Assist in the safe operation of the boat
    • Keep a lookout and immediately report any dangers on the water and in the boat.
SEAMANSHIP
  • Describe the correct sail combinations to carry under various wind and sea conditions.
  • Describe the dangers of a lee shore.
  • Read and interpret the following information from the NOAA nautical chart of the local are.
  • Depth of water
  • Types of bottom (sand, rock, clay, etc.)
  • Underwater / surface hazards (kelp, cable, rock, shoals, cribs, wrecks, currents)
  • Buoys and what they signify
  • Lights
  • Beacons
  • Distance scale

Describe:

  • A good anchorage
  • Suitable ground tackle and scope when anchoring for lunch
  • Suitable ground tackle, scope and the appropriate lights when anchoring overnight

Describe the immediate action to be taken when:

A leak develops Steering fails Anchor drags
Propeller fouls Halyard breaks Rigging fails
Running aground Grounding at anchor

Describe one commonly accepted use for each of the following knots:

bowline clove hitch figure eight
sheet bend reef knot Round turn & two half hitches

SAILING SKILLS

A Certified Sailor has successfully demonstrated his or her ability to:

PRELIMINARIES

  • Demonstrate on land the correct method of putting on a personal flotation device in the water.
  • Carry out a check of the vessel's gear and equipment in accordance with legal requirements and ASA recommendations and demonstrate the use and care of domestic equipment.
  • Demonstrate safe winch techniques with particular attention to:
    • High possible strain on sheets and halyards
    • Overriding turns (overrides) and how to clear them
    • Position of hands and fingers
    • Winch handle fitting, removal and storage
    • Halyard breaks / stops
    • Anchor winches / windlass
  • Perform the ASA outboard motor checklist prior to starting an outboard motor.
BOAT HANDLING UNDER POWER
  • Start an auxiliary engine observing commonly accepted safety practices.
  • Come to a full stop with the bow one half length away from a buoy using reverse. The objective of this exercise is to know how much distance is required to bring a sailboat to a full stop. The sailboat is to be kept o a straight course while this exercise is being carried out.
  • Maneuver a sailboat under power to a position not more than two feet alongside and parallel to a dock (port side and starboard side to) without the aid of lines and without the bow passing a given mark at any time during the maneuver.
MAN OVERBOARD
  • Demonstrate a skipper's actions / commands while under power from the time a member of the crew falls overboard without warning until the crew is safely recovered. A float should be used for this exercise. The man overboard is considered as not wearing a lifejacket and is able to assist himself. Included in this Standard are the following minimum requirements: lookout, alertness, life ring/ marking, slow, controlled speed approaching the float, crew control, and engine control.
  • Stop an auxiliary engine (outboard motor) and secure it for the night observing commonly accepted safety practices.
  • Anchor in water more than ten feet in depth securely enough so the anchor does not drag with engine at half-throttle astern.
  • Raise anchor with boat ready and get underway under power using commonly accepted practices.

BOAT HANDLING UNDER SAIL

POINTS OF SAIL

  • Function as helmsman and crew giving correct commands and proper responses while demonstrating the proper techniques of close hauled sailing, reaching (all three points), running, coming about and gybing, heading up, bearing away, luffing, and reducing heel on all points of sail.
  • Describe proper preparatory commands and commands of execution for all sailing skills included in this standard.
REEFING / HEAVING TO
  • Reduce sail by reefing and shake out a reef while keeping vessel under control and on course.
  • Heave to and get underway again.

MAN OVERBOARD

  • Demonstrate a skipper's actions and commands while under sail from the time a member of the crew falls overboard without warning until the crew is safely recovered. A float may be used for this exercise. The person overboard is considered as not wearing a lifejacket and is able to assist himself.
  • Included in the Standard are the following minimum requirements: alertness, life ring / marking, lookout, slow, controlled speed approaching the man / float, and crew control. The crew can be three or ore but the candidate is to describe the actions to be taken of one member of a two person crew falls overboard with the boat under sail.
  • Describe at least two methods of getting a person out of the water and back on board.
STEERING
  • Sail an ordered compass course for 5 minutes without varying more than 10 degrees from the ordered heading.
MAKING FAST AND SNUGGING DOWN / SECURING TO A DOCK AND MOORING
  • Secure a boat to various dock configurations so as to provide limited movement and set out fenders correctly.
  • Take extra precautions and secure a vessel for the night at a dock and at a mooring.
KNOTS

Tie the following knots within 15 seconds:

  • Bowline
  • Reef Knot
  • Sheet Bend
  • Clove Hitch
  • Round Turn and Half Hitches

Tie the following knots within 7 seconds:

  • Figure Eight
  • Cleat Hitch

ASA 104 - Bareboat Chartering [back to page top]

General Description: An advanced cruising Standard for individuals with cruising experience. The individual can act as skipper or crew of a 28 - 50 foot boat sailing by day in coastal waters. The Standard includes knowledge of boat systems and maintenance procedures.

SAILING KNOWLEDGE

A Certified Sailor has successfully demonstrated his or her ability to:

PLANNING

State and discuss the following:

  • The fuel tank capacity and powering range of the candidate's boat.
  • Factors which affect the range under power
  • The boat's water capacity and crew's minimum daily water requirements
  • The causes, prevention and treatments for sea sickness
  • The appropriate clothing for sailing (comfort and safety)
  • Menu planning and provisioning and suitability to the day's activities
  • The minimum contents of a first aid kit for a one week cruise
  • The spare engine parts for a one week cruise
  • The documents and procedures required to cross international borders and how to determine the above for any cruising location
LIVING AFLOAT
  • Discuss galley procedures that minimize the danger of fire, scalding or other galley accidents.
  • Use common cooking systems (stoves and fuel).
WEATHER
  • Describe the sea breeze and land breeze effect.
  • Identify conditions which cause fog.
SEAMANSHIP
  • Describe the use of a radar reflector.
  • Describe and discuss what to do when (under power);
    • The engine cooling water fails to flow
    • The engine fails in a crowded anchorage where safe sailing is impossible
    • The engine fails in a busy channel
  • Describe two methods of getting a man overboard back on board.
  • Describe the information required and the procedure for tying a boat to a fixed dock in areas with a large tidal range.
  • State the factors to be considered before allowing anyone to go swimming while at anchor
  • Describe how to secure the boat with an anchor on the bow or stern with the other end made fast to a dock or shore.
  • Describe the use of an anchor to hold boat off a windward dock when abreast of that dock.
  • Describe methods of rafting at anchor and potential dangers.
  • Describe the actions taken to prevent the dinghy from bumping the boat in the night.
  • Describe the proper operating procedures for the marine head and list precautions that prevent malfunction.
  • Describe the following common courtesies and customs of yachtsmen:
    • Permission to board
    • Permission to come alongside
    • Courtesy in crossing adjacent boats when rafted
    • Right of first boat at an anchorage
    • Keeping clear of boats racing
  • Flag etiquette: national flag, courtesy flag, burgee / house flag
  • Offering assistance to other yachtsmen in trouble

SAILING SKILLS

A Certified Sailor has successfully demonstrated his or her ability to:

  • Perform routine daily and weekly maintenance procedures on an engine.
  • Locate and check condition of all USCG required equipment aboard.
  • Maneuver the boat under power in a confined space.
  • Stop the bow of the boat within four feet of a fixed marker in various conditions while under power (pick up a mooring buoy).
  • Dock stern or bow to dock or shore using bow or stern anchor.
  • Apply 72 COLREGS (Navigation Rules), rules 1 - 19.
  • Demonstrate basic use of the VHF.
  • Check that all systems and equipment on the boat are in working order:
    • Engine, electrical system, stove, electronics, sails, hull, deck hardware, ground tackle, and through-hulls and demonstrate knowledge of safety relating to them.
  • Demonstrate the proper operation of a marine stove and he proper way to extinguish a fire.
  • Demonstrate suitable methods and precautions while towing a dinghy.
  • Sail a compass course with sails set properly while reaching and running.
  • Demonstrate two different ways of returning to a man overboard in moderate winds.
  • Plot a course and determine compass heading and E.T.A.
  • Read a nautical chart and identify corresponding landmarks and aids to navigation.
  • Take a fix using visual bearings.
  • Determine the depth above or below chart datum using tide tables.
  • Pilot a boat into an unfamiliar harbor or anchorage by day using a nautical chart and tidal information.
  • Obtain and interpret the marine forecast.
  • Set and retrieve two anchors set in a Bahamian mooring (for and aft).
  • Has acted as skipper and crew on a live-aboard cruise of at least 48 hours.

KNOTS

  • Tie a rolling hitch and a trucker's hitch in 20 seconds or less.

ASA 105 - Coastal Navigation [back to page top]
General Description: Able to demonstrate the navigational theory required to safely navigate a sailing vessel in coastal or inland waters. There is no Sailing Skills part to this Standard and practical application of this Sailing Knowledge is found in the Advanced Coastal Cruising Standard.

SAILING KNOWLEDGE

A Certified Sailor has successfully demonstrated his or her ability to:

  • Explain the chart symbols and conventions on U.S. nautical charts in accordance with the terminology of chart #1.
  • Identify a source of official U.S. Coast Guard navigation publications.
  • List the publications required for prudent navigation in the local area including the following ASA minimum requirements:
  • Large scale charts of the area and chart #1
  • Federal Requirements for Recreational Boats
  • USCG Navigation Rules
  • State small vessel regulations
  • Local rules and regulations, if applicable
  • Local sailing directions
  • Tide and current tables, if applicable
  • List of lights, buoys, and fog signals
  • Radio aids to navigation (if using radio or RDF)
  • List the instruments required for prudent navigation in the local area including the following minimum requirements:
    • Steering compass and deviation table
    • Handbearing compass and / or pelorus
    • Binoculars
    • Protractor or parallel rule
    • Depth sounder or leadline
    • Pencil, eraser, and notebook
    • Dividers
    • Watch or clock
    • Log / Knotmeter
  • Describe the purpose of "Notice to Mariners."
  • Use the tide and current tables to find:
    • Times and heights of tides at reference and secondary ports.
    • Direction and rate of current at referenced and secondary stations.
  • Convert courses and bearings between true, magnetic, and compass.
  • Check compass deviation by means such as a transit bearing.
  • Plot a dead reckoning position on a chart using speed, time and course to steer.
  • Allow for the effect of current and leeway to plot the estimated position.
  • Determine a course to steer which takes into account known current and leeway.
  • Determine current given the course steered and speed and two observed positions.
  • Plot a chart position from terrestrial objects using:
    • Two or more bearings on different objects taken at one time.
    • Bearings at different times (i.e. a running fix).
    • One bearing and transit range.
    • One distance (i.e. a sounding or dipping a light) and one bearing.
  • Use the above techniques to chart a course of at least 20 miles and 3 course changes.
  • Explain the terms and characteristics used for lighted navigation aids.
  • Explain the significance of shapes, colors, and lights used in the buoyage system.

106 - Advanced Coastal Cruising [back to page top]

General Description: Able to safely act as skipper and crew of a sailing vessel about 30 to 50 feet in length in coastal and inland waters, in any conditions.

SAILING KNOWLEDGE

A Certified Sailor has successfully demonstrated his or her ability to:

  1. Describe the theory of true and apparent wind.
  2. Describe the theory of sailing using force diagrams. Graphically find the center of effort and center of resistance of sails and keel, respectively.
  3. Describe with the aid of diagrams the causes of lee and weather helm and methods of correcting them. Include the reasons for preference of slight weather helm, sail selection (including full sails or reefed sails), mast position and mast rake.
  4. Describe sail shapes and sail interactions as needed for different wind strengths and points of sail. Describe the effects on sail shape and sail interactions when adjusting the following:
    Luff tension Outhaul Downhaul
    Leech line Boomvang Cunningham
    Backstay tension Jib fairleads Jib sheet tension
    Mainsheet Traveller

    Weather
  5. Identify how to use a barometer and a thermometer either singly or together to assist in predicting weather.
  6. Describe cirrus, cirrostratus, altocumulus, stratocumulus, cumulonimbus and cumulus clouds and the weather expected to be associated with each.
  7. Describe local weather in relation to thermal winds and prevailing winds.
  8. Describe three sources of weather information available to yachtsmen in the United States. 

    Seamanship
  9. Describe the proper selection of sails on a given boat for all weather conditions and give reasons for the selection made.
  10. Describe the appropriate heavy weather precautions for the boat selected and describe how they are carried out. Include sail changes, use of special equipment (safety harness, sea anchor), doubling up of gear, special checks in areas liable to chafe, stowage of equipment (above and below decks), additional checks on condition of bilge, special arrangements for towing dinghy/tender (if used), problems of fatigue, selection of clothing, and the need of at least two on deck at all times.
  11. Describe all the steps to be taken by skipper and crew for "heaving to" and "lying ahull."
  12. Describe the methods Of rafting at anchor and the possible problems with day and night rafting.
  13. Describe how to prevent the tender/dinghy from riding up and bumping the vesselâs hull while anchored at night.
  14. Describe step by step how to secure a boat overnight with one anchor and stem made fast to the shore or dock.
  15. Describe two methods of using a second anchor to reduce swinging.
  16. Describe four different methods of recovering an anchor which is fouled on the bottom.
  17. Describe when and how to use a trip line and an anchor buoy.
  18. Describe when and how to set an anchor watch and the responsibilities of such a watch.
  19. Describe how to:
    • Prepare a towing bridle
    • Pass a tow to another boat
    • Get underway with a tow and which speeds to use
    • Avoid fouling the propeller
    • Avoid danger of towline parting under stress
    • Make proper lookout arrangements
  20. List from memory the visual distress signals listed in the applicable U. S. Coast Guard publications.
  21. Describe how the boat should be handled and what actions should be taken when the following emergencies occur while under sail-
    • The boat is dismasted
    • The boat runs aground on a lee shore
  22. Describe how the boat should be handled and what remedial action should be taken when the following emergencies occur while under power:
    • The engine cooling water fails to flow.
    • The engine fails in a crowded anchorage.
    • The engine fails in a busy channel.
  23. State the fuel tank capacity and range of the selected boat and thefactors that could affect its range.
  24. State the water tank capacity on your boat and the minimum water requirement per person-
  25. Describe the skipper's responsibilities and action for the following common courtesies and customs of yachtsmen:
    • Permission to board.
    • Permission and entitlement to come alongside.
    • Permission and entitlement to cross adjacent boats when rafted.
    • Rights of first boat at an anchorage.
    • Keep clear of boats racing (even though cruising boats may be the "stand on boats").
    • Offering assistance to yachtsmen in trouble.
    • Flag etiquette: National flag, Courtesy flag, Burgee/house flag, Dipping flag.
    • Lines dangling over side.
    • Fenders over side when underway.
    • Checking of boat's appearance (shipshape & Bristol).
  26. List the documents required and the procedures followed when leaving and entering U.S. territorial waters. 

    Engineering
  27. Describe and demonstrate the appropriate collective measures for the following common engine problems as applicable to the boat selected:
    • Stoppage in fuel line
    • Burned and defective points
    • Fouled spark plug/injector problems
    • Carburetor icing (spring and fall sailing)
    • Unserviceable starter
    • Electrolysis
  28. Describe when and how to carry out an oil change in the engine selected.
  29. Describe the minimum preseason maintenance and checks given to the following:
    • Hull (including underwater fittings, electrical systems, painting, antifouling)
    • Spars and rigging (including electrolysis)
    • Sails 

    Safety
  30. Describe recommended permanent and temporary installation methods of grounding for lightning.
  31. State the factors you would consider before allowing anyone to go swimming while the boat is at anchor.
  32. State the danger of overhead power lines.
  33. Describe the uses, capabilities and limitations of a portable radar reflector. 

    SAILING SKILLS

    Boat Handling Under Sail (by Day and Night, 30 hours minimum ASA instructional program)

    A Certified Sailor has successfully demonstrated his or her ability to:

  34. Act as helmsman and demonstrate the proper techniques of beating, reaching, running, tacking, jibing, heading up, heading down (bearing away) and luffing in approximately 20 knots of wind.
  35. Work to weather to best advantage using wind shifts, tides and local geography.
  36. Sail a compass course (within 10 degrees) with sails trimmed.
  37. Demonstrate correct methods of towing a dinghy.
  38. Properly carry out nighttime man overboard procedures.
  39. Demonstrate correct procedures for hoisting, setting, trimmings, jibing, dousing and packing a spinnaker.*
  40. Anchor, weigh anchor, pick up and cast off moorings while acting as helmsman and/or crew.
  41. Demonstrate how to take a sounding using two different methods.
  42. Stand a navigation watch during a passage of about 20 miles by night and 20 miles by day and demonstrate all of the skills required for the ASA Coastal Navigation Standard.

*Spinnaker work is optional. The certifying instructor will indicate spinnaker use in the certification box on page


Why Choose ASA Certification?

  • ASA has had a fully functioning, nationwide keelboatprogram since 1983.
  • ASA standards are used by more than 250 participatingschools throughout North America and the Caribbeanrepresenting about 90% of the viable, commercialsailing schools in the U.S. making it the undisputedstandard for sailing education in the country.
  • ASA has certified more than 4000 professional sailinginstructors from around the world.
  • ASA has certified over 200,000 students.
  • ASA credentials are recognized at schools and chartercompanies around the world.
  • ASA courses are approved by the U.S. Coast Guardand the Nation Association of State Boating LawAdministrators.
  • ASA established a comprehensive, national sailingschool insurance program.
  • ASA textbooks have sold more copies than any otherbooks of their kind and are published and distributedby some of the largest publishers in the world includingSimon & Schuster, Norton and McGraw/Hill.
  • ASA textbooks are written by teachers, not journalistsor famous racers.
  • ASA's basic textbook, Sailing fundamentals, wasselected by the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary as itsofficial Learn-to-Sail text.
  • ASA sponsors the prestigious ASA School of the YearAward.
  • ASA sponsors the annual ASA Outstanding EducatorAward to 12 instructors from around the country.
  • ASA maintains one of the most active sailing WebSites in the world.
  • Philosophically ASA and its schools believe sailing is safe, fun and easy to learn. It's only complicated and intense if those teaching it chooses to present it that way, we don't.
Santa Barbara Sailing Center - At the Santa Barbara Harbor, Next to the Launch Ramp (805)962-2826

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